It is currently Tue Oct 22, 2019 7:52 pm

All times are UTC+01:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 1588 posts ]  Go to page Previous 160 61 62 63 64 Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:32 pm 
Online
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 9:42 am
Posts: 26208
PBFMullethunter wrote:
Slacks wrote:
Where this debate normally falls down is that Foota defines anything that's public funded as 'government', whereas I'd consider bodies like the health service and justice system as implementors of government policy. It's not quite that black and white but it is a distinction.


typical commie shit



Those damn commies.

_________________
Empir immoto


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:43 pm 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 12:00 pm
Posts: 20349
Location: teh internet
Everything should be privatized including roads and tap water. Only then will we be truly free.

Oh, military too. They should crowdsource their funding instead of leeching off hard working taxpayers.


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:01 pm 
Offline
Major
Major
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:40 pm
Posts: 17407
Slacks wrote:
Where this debate normally falls down is that Foota defines anything that's public funded as 'government', whereas I'd consider bodies like the health service and justice system as implementors of government policy. It's not quite that black and white but it is a distinction.


Does it matter?

Even the "implementors" are still navigating Government regulations and rules.

For instance, the California government regulated that anyone working on a Public Works job (funded by tax dollars) has to pay obscene union wages, even if you are a private sector firm. This is just a naked power grab by the Public Sector Unions to try and discourage the Cities and States from hiring lower cost and better performing companies to do infrastructure work.

This is why it costs nearly 3X as much to build roads in California compared to the rest of the country. It also explains why California has the shittiest infrastructure in the country, because we can't afford to build new stuff with all of the added costs imposed by California government.


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:04 pm 
Offline
Major General
Major General
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:00 pm
Posts: 33959
Foota wrote:
Slacks wrote:
Where this debate normally falls down is that Foota defines anything that's public funded as 'government', whereas I'd consider bodies like the health service and justice system as implementors of government policy. It's not quite that black and white but it is a distinction.


Does it matter?

Even the "implementors" are still navigating Government regulations and rules.


*Everyone* follows government regulations and rules.

_________________
Norks


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:06 pm 
Online
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 9:42 am
Posts: 26208
Slacks wrote:
Foota wrote:
Slacks wrote:
Where this debate normally falls down is that Foota defines anything that's public funded as 'government', whereas I'd consider bodies like the health service and justice system as implementors of government policy. It's not quite that black and white but it is a distinction.


Does it matter?

Even the "implementors" are still navigating Government regulations and rules.


*Everyone* follows government regulations and rules.



I follow most regulations and rules but not all :-"

_________________
Empir immoto


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:12 pm 
Offline
Major
Major
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:40 pm
Posts: 17407
Slacks wrote:

*Everyone* follows government regulations and rules.


Some regulations and rules are more onerous and impactful than others.

I don't find the basic criminal code that onerous as I don't commit crimes. It is basically non-existent in my life.

But the tax code in California is fucking terrible taking an additional 10% of my income on top of Federal Taxes. Ditto with taxes they put on gas almost doubling the cost of gas compared to the national average. There are loads of California unique rules and regulations making it very difficult to live here unless you make alot of money.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:45 am 
Online
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 9:42 am
Posts: 26208
Foota wrote:
Slacks wrote:

*Everyone* follows government regulations and rules.


Some regulations and rules are more onerous and impactful than others.

I don't find the basic criminal code that onerous as I don't commit crimes. It is basically non-existent in my life.

But the tax code in California is fucking terrible taking an additional 10% of my income on top of Federal Taxes. Ditto with taxes they put on gas almost doubling the cost of gas compared to the national average. There are loads of California unique rules and regulations making it very difficult to live here unless you make alot of money.



By gas do you mean gas or petrol? It's hard to understand you murricuns.

_________________
Empir immoto


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:04 am 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 12:00 pm
Posts: 20349
Location: teh internet
barcelona wrote:
Foota wrote:
Slacks wrote:

*Everyone* follows government regulations and rules.


Some regulations and rules are more onerous and impactful than others.

I don't find the basic criminal code that onerous as I don't commit crimes. It is basically non-existent in my life.

But the tax code in California is fucking terrible taking an additional 10% of my income on top of Federal Taxes. Ditto with taxes they put on gas almost doubling the cost of gas compared to the national average. There are loads of California unique rules and regulations making it very difficult to live here unless you make alot of money.



By gas do you mean gas or petrol? It's hard to understand you murricuns.


It could be either, or both.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:15 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
Image

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:16 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
OCTOBER 9, 2019

Bojo Goes Bonkers: Two Borders Will Divide Ireland From Northern Ireland

by KENNETH SURIN


BoJo is nothing if not inventive. The Irish backstop problem had derailed the premiership of his predecessor the Maybot, and he was making no headway in dealing with it up to now.

The Good Friday peace agreement between the north and the south of Ireland requires a flexible border to exist between the two.

But Brexit would have (the non-EU) UK share a border with (the EU-member) Ireland, and the EU does not countenance a flexible border (tariff-free, free movement of peoples, etc.) between itself and non-EU countries– unless the UK strikes an agreement with the EU similar to the one Norway has. But that would amount to a soft Brexit, which of course is absolutely unacceptable to hardline Brexiters.

A hard border would therefore scupper the prospect of a Brexit deal between the UK and the EU, leaving an economically-catastrophic No Deal Brexit as the only option.

So BoJo, or someone in his team, came up with a jolly wheeze.

Why not have 2 borders, with the soft one existing where the Ireland-Northern Ireland border currently exists, and have a second border perhaps a few miles down the road, fully in Northern Ireland itself, where all the hard stuff (customs checks, immigration controls, and so forth) could be done?

When BoJo presented his 2-border proposal to the EU president Jean-Claude Juncker in a phone call, BoJo described his plan was a “fair and reasonable compromise”, saying that if the two sides could not reach agreement it would amount to “a failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible”.

While the EU is expected to take a few days to respond officially to this hare-brained proposal, the head of the European Parliament’s Brexit steering group Guy Verhofstadt said immediately it was “absolutely not positive” since it did not provide the required safeguards for Ireland. Donald Tusk, the EU Council President, informed BoJo the EU is “still unconvinced” by his 2-borders proposal while telling Ireland “we stand fully behind you”.

Ireland’s agreement is therefore essential if the 2-borders plan is to go through, but its prime minister, Leo Varadkar, said in response that “I don’t fully understand how we can have Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in a separate customs unions [sic] and somehow avoid there being tariffs and checks and customs posts between north and south”.

Varadkar is right: the presumed 2-borders notwithstanding, there would still be tariffs on north-south trade, which would undermine the crucial farming and agri-food sector in both parts of Ireland, while businesses adjacent to the border would have to contend with barriers separating them from their customers and supply chains.

A key concern in the north of Ireland (as is the case elsewhere in the UK), is the Tory Brexiter plans to replace the EU’s regulatory framework prevailing in the UK up to now.

A key element in the ending of the Troubles in Northern Ireland has been the relative prosperity brought about by the peace agreement. A cessation of this prosperity would probably contribute to the undoing of the peace agreement.

It’s clear the Tories want a very different regulatory environment, one approximating more to the US than the EU— that is, much more “flexibility” on wages, lower taxes for the rich, and an across-the-board relaxation of environmental standards currently imposed by the EU.

The suspicion in some quarters is that BoJo advanced his absurd 2-borders proposal to gull his followers into thinking that he is serious about negotiating with the EU in a “spirit of compromise”, when of course anyone adequately informed (a description alas not applicable to most of his Brexiter followers) will know that putting forward such proposals for an “agreement” that are belly-up the moment they are mooted is exactly BoJo’s well-planned road to a No Deal Brexit.

He can then say to these followers that he tried ever so hard to secure a “compromise” with the EU, but those bastard eurocrats simply refused to meet him halfway.

A leaked memo from Johnson’s office to Tory MPs confirms this suspicion by saying that “This [rejection of the 2-border proposal] will be seen by everybody as a crazy policy. We have offered a compromise to avoid this situation”.

BoJo’s blaming of the EU for the failure to reach a Brexit agreement will of course be amplified in the rightwing tabloids supporting him to the hilt.

Also supporting BoJo’s 2-border plan is the predecessor, Dodgy Dave Cameron, who got this shambles on the road by calling for the referendum in 2016, and who resigned rather than clear-up the mess he created.

Getting an endorsement from Dodgy Dave is like having your newly-purchased shares endorsed by Bernie Madoff, so this one will probably not be talked-up by BoJo.

BoJo, though, as always, speaks with a forked tongue.

He told the right-wing Brexiter loons in his party that he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than seek an extension, and that the UK will leave on 31 October “do or die”.

At the same time government documents submitted to the Court of Session said BoJo will send a letter asking for an extension to Article 50 – despite his repeated assertions that he will never delay Brexit.

So which BoJo are we to believe?

As I write the French president Emmanuel Macron has given BoJo until the end of the week to revise his Brexit plan to be accordant with EU requirements, something BoJo can’t do without causing his party to meltdown.

All escape tunnels are now being sealed-off for the ferret-like British prime minister.

Kenneth Surin teaches at Duke University, North Carolina. He lives in Blacksburg, Virginia.

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:42 pm 
Offline
Sergeant First-Class
Sergeant First-Class
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 12:00 pm
Posts: 3409
His bonkers plan of 2 borders is seen a different way in N.Ireland (by certain Unionist parties) . it's being seen as giving a chunk of N.Ireland back to Eire which as you can imagine is NOT going down well.

_________________
"I get irreversible brain herpes from Fuckwits"

"you stupid illiterate fucking bastard fuck. Maybe you should grab a dictionary instead, you fucking twat wanker. Oh, and fuck you and your stupid fucking boat. Fucking fuck.
Now fuck off out of this thread, you buttfucking fucking asshole." Slacks


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:03 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
I think the Republic would be an ideal candidate for showing the Rest of the World the way forward with decentralisation of Government authority.

Start by having Leinster, Munster and Connacht become independent nations; then when they’ve gotten used to that, further sovereignise the counties within each province as independent states.

All of these newly-formed Irish states will all be members of the European Union. So no need for any kinds of border or restrictions on movement. (Eurozone membership should be optional, so that I can advise against it.)

They can still all vote en bloc in EU and UN bodies; and if the UK can send “Team GB” to the Olympic Games; then the newly-minted Confederation of Irish States can do similar with a “Team Éire”.

They will just have decentralized and distributed political power and authority (though Leo Varadkar does seem to be one of the saner National leaders currently doing the rounds).

And will show the Rest of the World the Way Forward.

[III] <:-P [III]

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:08 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:06 pm
Posts: 2921
>*^*<


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:22 am 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 12:00 pm
Posts: 20349
Location: teh internet
Rule Britannia


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:55 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:06 pm
Posts: 2921
PBFMullethunter wrote:
Rule Britannia

:-h


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:43 pm 
Offline
Major General
Major General
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:00 pm
Posts: 33959
Quote:
A leave voter is willing to publicly hold completely contradictory views on the state of Brexit, it has emerged.

Simone Williams, a newly qualified dolls house surveyor from South London, made an appeared on BBC’s flagship weekly shoutfest Question Time to inform everyone that somehow she knew exactly what she was voting for, and also that no-one actually knows what ‘this’ will eventually be.

“Oh I knew EXACTLY what I was voting for,” yelled Simone with a bewildering grimace of pride, confusion and anger.

“It’s just you remoaners who think we didn’t know, we knew alright. We knew precisely what we were doing.

“Just to be clear, we voted Leave either to leave with a deal, leave with no-deal, leave with some sort of Norway model for trade, or threaten to leave and then expect the EU to offer us a deal.

“I voted for there to be a hard border with Ireland or not a hard border with Ireland, a possible soft border between Ireland and Northern Ireland or maybe an imaginary border in the Irish Sea.

“And on that ballot paper three years ago I voted for Brexit to either lead to Scottish Independence, or to make the Union stronger.”

She concluded, “Oh I think it’s pretty clear that I knew what I was voting for, so don’t you try patronising me by telling me I didn’t!

“Just because no-one knows what will happen at the end of this month, doesn’t mean it won’t be precisely what I voted for three years ago.

“I suppose because you’re all know-it-all Remoaners you’re going to insist that just because everything would have stayed exactly the same if the referendum had gone the other way you know exactly what would have happened. Well that’s rubbish, we’d all have been conscripted to the EU army if we had!”

_________________
Norks


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:42 pm 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 12:00 pm
Posts: 20349
Location: teh internet
watching Wales vs. Croatia now


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:37 am 
Online
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 9:42 am
Posts: 26208
PBFMullethunter wrote:
watching Wales vs. Croatia now




1-1
"......""........
Fucking disappointed in Engurlund

_________________
Empir immoto


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:34 am 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
14 October 2019

The fantasy of Britain at war could be nearing its last hurrah

John Harris


Image

Can you hear it: the theme from The Great Escape, and the hum of Spitfire engines? Such is the mood music that echoes around many leading Brexiteers: men who seem to have all but forgotten the comparatively recent conflict centred on Northern Ireland but affect to be consumed by the distant stuff of Dunkirk, the blitz and VE day. Question marks still hang over how we will get to a general election, but some aspects of the looming campaign seem certain. If Boris Johnson somehow gets a deal with the EU and manages to steer it through parliament, he will presumably continue to talk about a country destined to stand apart from Europe and set an example to the world of derring-do, mention Winston Churchill and use a lot of martial metaphors. If everything comes to grief and he has to request the dreaded extension, that stuff will doubtless be accompanied by rhetoric about remainer MPs and judges, the obstinate and unreliable French and Germans, and a view of Ireland as a country that has ideas above its station.

Deal or no deal, all these things will presumably be voiced by Nigel Farage and the Brexit party – who, like their fellow Brexiteers in the Conservative party, have a vision of Britain unbound that harks back to the days of empire, and a loud obsession with Britain’s role in the second world war, or their imagined version of it.

After all this time, these things are ingrained in the Brexit moment and the spaces where politics meets culture, probably for the foreseeable future. Johnson fumes about parliament’s “surrender bill”, as those increasingly irksome No 10 “sources” warn of MPs colluding with “foreign powers”. Nigel Farage rallies begin with the sound of air-raid sirens. Allies and supporters of the prime minister regularly bring up his Churchill fixation, and claim that the spirit of the man on the £5 banknote is being channelled anew, even though what is afoot is obviously much less noble than that. Last week, when he and his people decided to blame Angela Merkel for their waning hopes of a deal, they surely knew what they were doing: tapping into a rich seam of British prejudice that was made clear last week in a Twitter meme put around by Arron Banks and his accomplices at Leave.EU, only to be deleted. “We didn’t win two world wars to be pushed around by a Kraut,” it said: a view of 20th-century history traditionally voiced by English football hooligans after 12 lagers and too much sunshine.

Banks was born in 1966; Johnson and Farage in 1964. Mark Francois, the Conservative MP who needs no encouragement to hold forth about his father’s wartime service and the necessity of standing up to Germany, entered the world in 1965. By the time they were even aware of such things, the end of the second world war was a quarter of a century away, and what remained of the empire was being mocked on TV by David Frost (“Fiji, Mauritius, Swaziland, the New Hebrides Condominium … and sweet Rockall”). But more than 50 years on, their secondhand nostalgia seems to have found a ready audience, as keen as them on the idea that Britannia could once again rule the waves and stick it to the continentals, if only the people Johnson calls “the doomsters and the gloomsters” would let her.

That the prime minister often presents this stuff wrapped in a sense of the absurd only highlights how ludicrously misplaced it all is. This is not just because of our impossible historical distance from the events these people eulogise and the social transformations that have happened in the meantime (self-evidently, to yearn for the spirit of pre-50s Britain runs the risk of celebrating a country that was monoculturally white and ridden with bigotry, and an imperial ideal racist in both theory and practice). Decades of cultural history have also undermined just about every aspect of the Brexiteers’ view of things.

The first Colonel Blimp cartoon, I was recently reminded, appeared in 1934. With no little prescience, it was captioned: “Gad, sir, Lord Beaverbrook is right. Splendid isolation is the policy for England. If we refuse to trade with the dashed foreigners in Ireland, Wales and Scotland … the future will be in sight.” Later on, didn’t the great cultural explosions of the 60s decisively pull us away from the last traces of wartime jingoism, as the union flag was reinvented as a totem of camp, and the supposed glories of war and empire were suddenly sent up? In the Beatles’ 1967 masterpiece A Day in the Life, the enervated, gently mocking way that John Lennon sings one line in particular – “The English army had just won the war” – seems to open up the possibility of a whole load of national delusions being subverted.

And so it proved: the so-called satire boom was already in full flow – and then along came Monty Python’s bursting of every pompous English balloon, and even Dad’s Army, with its affectionate portrayal of the farce and hilarity woven into the country’s finest hour.

When the UK’s descent into economic decline was met with Margaret Thatcher’s flag-waving and the rise of the National Front, it fell to the new generation of punks to try to explode their fantasies (listen to such songs as the Clash’s Something About England, the Jam’s Little Boy Soldiers, or the Sex Pistols’ ageless God Save the Queen). And so this strand of popular culture has gone on, speaking directly to millions of people and shaping their understanding of the country they live in. In the midst of the current madness, a good example is the Northampton-born rapper Slowthai, who has Caribbean, Irish and English ancestry, and styles himself as the Brexit Bandit. The title track of his debut album speaks volumes: “I said there’s nothing great about the place we live in/ Nothing great about Britain/ Sip a cup of tea whilst we’re spittin’/ There’s nothing great about Britain.”

Yet the old illusions refuse to die. To state the obvious, much of the blame for this country’s enduring mixture of hubris, nostalgia and Europhobia can be laid at the door of the tabloid press. It is responsible for framing everything from Germany v England football matches to Jacques Chirac’s opposition to the Iraq war in terms of unfinished business from 1939-45, and the idea that many European countries owe us a debt of gratitude they have never paid off. But there are also other, more insidious influences at work. When the likes of Farage and Francois talk about the war, I hear not an authentic echo of the struggles and victories of 1939-45, but the big-selling and very stupid comics I used to buy as a child in the late 70s: Warlord and Victor, replete with stories of “Jerries” and “Japs”, such characters as Union Jack Jackson and Bomber Braddock, and the basic message they carried – that there was no finer expression of Britishness than charging at the enemy, hoping for the best.

To anyone under 40, these things must surely seem weird beyond words, which ought to give cause for hope. So too might one basic fact about the Brexit moment: that the comical fantasy of a belligerent UK blazing its own trail is already being tested by reality. There again, given that the fictions of war and empire have endured for so long, would they really suddenly wither away? The results of the election – or, perhaps, another referendum – will give us an answer of sorts: one of the reasons why the next few months will decide not just who is in power, but the kind of place this conflicted, nervous country is going to be.

• John Harris is a Guardian columnist

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:46 am 
Offline
Major General
Major General
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:00 pm
Posts: 33959
Only two weeks to go. I have my Union Flags out ready to celebrate our new freedoms.

_________________
Norks


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 1:50 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
Not sure the Union Flag is going to be the one to wave.

You'll be safer with St. George's Flag.

:-S

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 3:43 pm 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 12:00 pm
Posts: 20349
Location: teh internet
You’ll be fine. Stiff upper lip and all that.


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:51 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
I'm trying to decide if I want to support the Roundheads or Cavaliers.

It'll come down to which hasthe greatest chance of seeing BoJo beheaded.

[-O<

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:59 pm 
Offline
Colonel
Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 12:00 pm
Posts: 20285
Slacks wrote:
Only two weeks to go. I have my Union Flags out ready to celebrate our new freedoms.


Holyman wrote:
Not sure the Union Flag is going to be the one to wave.

You'll be safer with St. George's Flag.

:-S


You two should fly the flag of the Soviet Union. For lulz.

Bonus points if you answer everything in Russian that day.

_________________
Ill sell ya the rope with which you shall hang yourself.
Capitalism for the Win.

PCNC and PBF live in death!


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:59 pm 
Offline
Holyman
Holyman
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 17249
Location: Earth
If Brexit does occur, I suspect the most expedient flag that should be flown by any pragmatic Englanders, will be..:

[**==]

I'll ask my Mum to start sewing 51st Star patches...

:|

_________________
Image

"“A rising share of the goods that make today’s capitalist economies grow would not sell if people dreamed other dreams than they do—which makes understanding, developing and controlling their dreams a fundamental concern of political economy in advanced-capitalist society.”" - Wolfgang Streeck


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 1588 posts ]  Go to page Previous 160 61 62 63 64 Next

All times are UTC+01:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: barcelona and 15 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited